Ballet changed one Jewel at a time

Neoclassical ballet now known as contemporary ballet will help spark interest into the dance world for non dancers. Neoclassical ballet is a ballet style that uses traditional ballet vocabulary but it shies away from the story line and plots of classical ballet and it focuses on the structure and lines.  It usually uses extreme tempos and has more complex movement; the spacing is usually more modern or complex than in classical ballet.

George Balanchine used flexed hands and feet, turned-in legs, off-centered positions and non-classical costumes such as leotards and tunics instead of tutus. That helped to distance himself from the classical and romantic ballet traditions. What is left is the dance itself, sophisticated but sleekly modern, retaining the pointe shoe aesthetic, but eschewing the well-upholstered drama and mime of the full length story ballet.

google images- (Balanchine ballet)

George Balanchine first neo classical ballet choreographed was Apollo in 1928. He choreographed other neo classical ballets such as Agon 1957 and Jewels in 1967. Jewels is an award-winning ballet in three parts created for New York City Ballet by George Balanchine. Jewels was called the first full-length abstract ballet. It can also be seen as three separate ballets, linked by their jewel-colored costumes. The dance has nothing to do with jewels; the dancers are just dressed like jewels. Rubies, to me is the most neo classical section in the ballet. It has high kicks, turned in legs, flexed feet, undulations and pelvic movement

Erik Jacobs from The New York Times

Here is the link to a video performance of Rubies http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FixT33wXqk8

Non traditional or classical ballet will keep an audience attention who is use to watching So You Think You Can Dance, which has very entertaining dance pieces with lots of tricks. Story ballets are slow and less exciting there may be a moment or two but not very many. They are pretty and are great for young children. It is important to keep the arts alive and that starts with the younger generation.

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